History

History2

Our aim is to fire students’ curiosity and imagination, moving and inspiring them with the dilemmas, choices and beliefs of people in the past. Our students study a range of people, events and situations from local, national and international history. History helps pupils develop their own identities through an understanding of history at personal, local, national and international levels. It helps them to ask and answer questions of the present by engaging with the past.

Students find out about the history of their community, Britain, Europe and the world. They develop a chronological overview that enables them to make connections within and across different periods and societies. They investigate Britain’s relationships with the wider world, and relate past events to the present day.

History prepares students for the future, equipping them with knowledge and skills that are prized in adult life, enhancing employability and developing an ability to take part in a democratic society. It encourages mutual understanding of the historic origins of our ethnic and cultural diversity, and helps pupils become confident and questioning individuals.

Students learn History within their Humanities lessons. The following topics will be studied during the year:

  • What is History? The development of historical skills including how to gather evidence and the significance of artefacts in History.
  • Life in the Middle Ages including how the Normans conquered England. The development and importance of castles in the consolidation of Norman power.
  • Life in the medieval period, including the causes of the Black Death, the importance of religion to English life, and how ordinary people led their daily lives in towns and villages.

HOW PARENTS CAN ASSIST:

  • Two key skills in History are the ability to communicate clearly in well-constructed sentences and the ability to justify things that are said about the past.? Parents can encourage and reinforce the importance of these skills by reading through and commenting on students’ work.
  • To help with communication and literacy, parents can spend time regularly listening to their child reading.
  • History is extremely popular on television and the internet. Look out for programmes such as “What the Normans Did For Us” and check libraries for the topics to be covered. Making visits to places of interest associated with the topics can help to bring history ‘alive’ for students and place events into historical context.
  • Look at the internet where possible to develop further understanding of historical topics. An excellent starting point is the BBC History website at www.bbc.co.uk/history. Also look out for regular History updates on the St Lawrence Academy website at www.tsla.co.uk

 

Students learn History within their Humanities lessons. The following topics will be studied during the year:

  • How English society developed in the sixteenth century, exploring groups such as Gentlemen, Citizens, Yeomen and Labourers in detail.
  • Why Tudor monarchs such as Henry VIII, Mary Tudor and Elizabeth I are still remembered to this day.
  • The importance of the religious divide on England in events such as the Spanish Armada.
  • The Stuart period culminating in the Civil War between Royalists and Parliamentarians, and the execution of Charles I.
  • The Commonwealth and Restoration under Charles II. An in-depth study of the significance of the Great Fire of London will be conducted.

HOW PARENTS CAN ASSIST:

  • Students will be expected to make further progress in communicating clearly their historical understanding and in justifying their general points by reference to the particular. Emphasis will be made on communicating ideas through use of video technology.
  • Parents can encourage students to review what they have written ensuring clarity and appropriate detail.
  • To help with communication and literacy, parents can further encourage student development by listening to their reading skills at regular intervals.
  • History is extremely popular on television and the internet. Look out for programmes such as “What the Tudors Did For Us” and check libraries for the topics to be covered. Making visits to places of interest associated with the topics can help to bring history ‘alive’ for students and place events into historical context.
  • Look at the internet where possible to develop further understanding of historical topics. An excellent starting point is the BBC History website at www.bbc.co.uk/history. Also look out for regular History updates on the St Lawrence Academy website at www.tsla.co.uk

Students learn History within their Humanities lessons. The following topics will be studied during the year:

  • The causes and consequences of both the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. In depth studies are conducted on factory conditions, and the role of Robert Owen in improving them. The emergence of Britain as the first industrial nation is also explored.
  • The development of transport, particularly the railways, from 1750 to 1900.
  • Why Britain wanted an Empire in the nineteenth century and how beneficial the Empire was.
  • World War I ? its causes and the changing attitudes to war
  • How Adolf Hitler came to power in Germany.
  • World War II ? an exploration into social aspects such as what life was like on the Home Front.

HOW PARENTS CAN ASSIST:

  • Students should now be developing their writing so that it should be clear to any reader what they are saying and why they are saying it. Parents can help students review their work critically to ensure it meets this criteria.
  • If there are any personal experiences relevant to the topics within the family or any war memorabilia, these can be discussed at home and in the classroom as a point of interest.
  • To help with communication and literacy, parents can further encourage student development by listening to their reading skills at regular intervals.
  • History is extremely popular on television and the internet. Look out for television programmes and check libraries for the topics to be covered. Making visits to places of interest associated with the topics can help to bring history ‘alive’ for students and place events into historical context.
  • Look at the internet where possible to develop further understanding of historical topics. An excellent starting point is the BBC History website at www.bbc.co.uk/history. Also look out for regular History updates on the St Lawrence Academy website at www.tsla.co.uk

In Years 10 and 11 students study the following topics:

  • The United States of America 1910-2000
  • Why did America boom after World War I? What was the Jazz Age?
  • How tolerant was America in the inter-war years? Why did the boom end? What was the New Deal and how successful was it?
  • Why sport became essential to Americans after World War I?
  • What impact did World War II have on the USA?
  • Why did the Cold War develop which soured relations with the Soviet Union?
  • How did the birth of Rock and Roll affect the first teenagers?
  • What was McCarthyism and why did many fear it?
  • How did Martin Luther King bring civil rights to the forefront of American politics?
  • Who broke into Watergate and why?
  • The end of the Cold War and how the USA became the only superpower.
  • Germany 1929-1948
  • How Germany fell into civil war following the defeat in World War I
  • The weakness of the Weimar Republic.
  • Rise and eventual fall due to world depression
  • The rise of the Nazis under Hitler
  • Life in Nazi Germany for minorities
  • The war economy
  • The Holocaust – its causes and implications.
  • The defeat of the Third Reich.

HOW PARENTS CAN ASSIST:

  • Students should now be developing their writing so that it should be clear to any reader what they are saying and why they are saying it. Parents can help students review their work critically to ensure it meets this criteria.
  • History is extremely popular on television and the internet. Look out for programmes designed to aid revision such as BBC GCSE Bitesize. Making visits to places of interest associated with the topics can help to bring history ‘alive’ for students and place events into historical context.
  • Look at the internet where possible to develop further understanding of historical topics. An excellent starting point is the BBC History website at www.bbc.co.uk/history. Also look out for regular History updates on the St Lawrence Academy website at www.tsla.co.uk